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INVESTIGATE:

Why did the United States invade Cuba? (Read each source below, then answer the questions in the notebook. Ask your teacher for an inquiry organizer worksheet to help you think about the ways that the sources support and contradict each other.)

SOURCES:

READ: Miss Cuba Receives an Invitation

Head Note: Miss Columbia (sitting) says to “her fair neighbor,” Miss Cuba (standing): "Won’t you join the stars and be my forty-sixth?" By December 1898, the U.S. had defeated the Spanish and the Treaty of Paris gave the U.S. control of Cuba, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines. In 1901, Cuba was under U.S. military rule, Cubans were drafting their constitution, and the role of the U.S. in Cuba was being debated in both countries.

Source: Chicago Record-Herald, 1901. Chicago, Illinois.

USE THE NOTEBOOK (instructions):

To answer these questions, log in below

Sourcing: Consider a document's attribution (both its author and how the document came into being).

When was this published? How long after the start of the Spanish-American War?

Close Reading: Read carefully to consider what a source says and the language used to say it.

Why might the cartoonist have chosen a ball and chain to represent Spain?

Close Reading: Read carefully to consider what a source says and the language used to say it.

Why is Miss Columbia sitting down in front of a map of the U.S.? Why is Miss Cuba standing politely? What do these images say about the relationship between Cuba and the U.S.?

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